Thematic Program on

Scientific and High–Performance Computing

Duration: 5 months

Academic Year: 2012 – 2013

The subject of the second thematic program is Scientific and High–Performance Computing and has a duration of five months. This thematic program will focus on the challenges of designing and developing large scale libraries of scientific software. The invited speakers will consist of people from groups supporting such scientific software libraries, and will be expected to present their model of operation, the infrastructure necessary for developing such libraries, as well as scientific and technical issues that have risen. In this thematic program we imbed the following two one-week-long workshops:

  • Software Frameworks for Challenging Computational Problems
    The goal of the workshop was two folded: a) present challenging computational problems emanating from real applications and b) present computational platforms for solving such problems. This is a very intense research area that involves researches from different disciplines. Hardware oriented computational challenges were also presented. Furthermore a very broad variety of applications such as ship dynamics, blood flow nanomaterials and molecular interactions in soft matter were presented.

    The workshop was held in the facilities of the center on January 14 – 18, 2013. A dedicated website for the workshop can be found here. The following scientists participated and gave a talk in the workshop:

    • Kostas Daoulas, Max – Planck Institute & University of Mainz, Germany
    • Andreas Dedner, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
    • Simone Deparis, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
    • Christian Engwer, University of Muenster, Germany
    • Dominik Goeddeke, University of Dortmund, Germany
    • Luca Heltai, SISSA, Italy
    • Johan Jansson, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden & Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, Bilbao, Spain
    • Karen Johnston, Max – Planck Institute & University of Mainz, Germany
    • Guido Kanschat, University of Heidelberg, Germany
    • Nektarios Lathiotakis, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Greece
    • Angelika Manhart, University of Wien, Austria
    • Stephen Metcalfe, University of Leicester, United Kingdom
    • Martin Nolte, University of Freiburg, Germany
    • Nicola Parolini, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
    • Ioannis Remediakis, University of Crete, Greece
    • Anastasia Rissanou, University of Crete, Greece
    • Rony Touma, Lebanese American University, Lebanon
    • Nico van der Vegt, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany
    • Garth Wells, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
    • Mariette Yvinec, INRIA, France
  • Geometric Computing
    he aim of the workshop was to bring together European scientists and groups working on various computational aspects arising in Computational Geometry and Geometric Computing. The workshop's focus was on the following three topics:
    • Algebraic tools in geometric computing: when it comes to computing geometric structures on curved objects, it is inevitable to rely on algebraic tools for answering predicates and computing geometric objects derived from the input (such as intersection points); this part of the workshop was focused on the algebraic tools that can be used to answer questions of this nature.
    • Resolving degeneracies be means of perturbation methods: geometric algorithms often assume that the input data is in general position, i.e., away from degeneracies. In practice, however, degeneracies do occur. One way to deal with them, and make the available algorithms works, despite the presence of degeneracies, is to perturb the input symbolically. This part of the workshop was dedicated to the presentation of the various techniques available for resolving degeneracies via symbolic perturbation techniques.
    • Voronoi diagrams: Voronoi diagrams are fundamental structures not only in Computational Geometry, but also in meshing, graphics, robotics, GIS, etc. This part of the workshop was focused on recent developments with respect to Voronoi diagrams, including Voronoi diagrams in orbifolds, higher–order Voronoi diagrams, anisotropic Voronoi diagrams, Voronoi diagrams in 3D and location strategies.


    The workshop was held in the facilities of the center on January 21 – 25, 2013. A dedicated website for the workshop can be found here. The following scientists participated and gave a talk in the workshop:

    • Victor Alvarez, Universität des Saarlandes, Germany
    • Yacine Bouzidi, INRIA Nancy - Grand Est & LORIA, France
    • Kevin Buchin, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, The Netherlands
    • Panagiotis Cheilaris, Università Della Svizzera italiana, Italy
    • Olivier Devillers, INRIA Sophia Antipolis – Méditerranée, France
    • Vissarion Fisikopoulos, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
    • Dan Halperin, Tel Aviv University, Israel
    • Michael Hemmer, Tel Aviv University, Israel
    • Sylvain Lazard, INRIA Nancy - Grand Est & LORIA, France
    • Guillaume Moroz, INRIA Nancy - Grand Est & LORIA, France
    • Evanthia Papadopoulou, Università Della Svizzera italiana, Italy
    • Marc Pouget, INRIA Nancy - Grand Est & LORIA, France
    • Raimund Seidel, Universität des Saarlandes, Germany
    • Monique Teillaud, INRIA Sophia Antipolis – Méditerranée, France
    • Elias Tsigaridas, INRIA Paris – Rocquencourt, France
    • Mariette Yvinec, INRIA Sophia Antipolis – Méditerranée, France

During the period of the thematic program the following scientists visited the center and collaborated with ACMAC members:

  • Georgios Akrivis
    Department of Computer Science, University of Ioannina, Greece
    12 Mar 2013 - 16 Mar 2013
  • Stephen L. Keeling
    University of Graz, Austria
    17 Feb 2013 - 23 Feb 2013
  • Karen Jhonston
    Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany
    13 Jan 2013 - 25 Jan 2013
  • Manolis Georgoulis
    University of Leicester, United Kingdom
    7 Jan 2013 - 9 Jan 2013
  • Manolis Georgoulis
    University of Leicester, United Kingdom
    19 Sep 2012 - 30 Sep 2012
  • Georgios Akrivis
    Department of Computer Science, University of Ioannina, Greece
    18 Sep 2012 - 25 Sep 2012